Tag Archives: attorney

USA Gymnastics Seeks Dismissal of Lawsuits Related to Larry Nassar

Michigan State University was the first to attempt to distance itself from lawsuits related to Larry Nassar’s sexual misconduct because, according to MSU, Michigan’s statute of limitations blocks the suits. Now, USA Gymnastics is making the same argument.

In briefs it’s filed with the courts, USAG argues that the majority of the claims against it are barred by law because of the statute of limitations.

In Michigan, the statute keeps personal injury suits from being filed three years after the date of the injury for adults and three years after the victim’s nineteenth birthday for injuries as a minor.

Because of the statute, MSU and USAG argue they are not liable for Nassar’s actions because victims waited too long to file suits.

Of the 149 cases against USA Gymnastics currently, USAG claims that at least 101 of them should be dismissed outright simply because the statute of limitations has run out. This means that the court could, if it agrees with USAG, drop the cases of 101 victims of sexual assault.

While Larry Nassar, USA Gymnastics, and Michigan State University have been in the national headlines, here in Wisconsin, James Kivisto, owner and operator of Wind Lake Gymnastics Center in Racine has been charged with ten counts of possession of child pornography.

At least some of the photos and videos may have been taken with a camera Kivisto hid in the girl’s bathroom at the Gymnastics Center. Kivisto has owned the Wind Lake Gymnastics Center for eleven years and has been a gymnastics coach since 1987.

What do the USAG and MSU dismissal attempts mean for Wisconsin victims? It means that it is more important than ever to seek legal representation if you or your child has been a victim of sexual misconduct by a gymnastics coach. In Wisconsin, the statute of limitation for personal injury is three years for adults but ends only two years after a minor victim’s eighteenth birthday.

At Groth Law Firm, S.C., we have a skilled, dedicated, proven, and compassionate team ready to help you seek justice during a difficult and emotional time. If you or your child has been the victim of sexual misconduct by a coach or other trusted trainer, contact us immediately at 414-375-2030, or toll free at 1-800-375-7001

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not legal advice and should not be used as legal advice. The legal statutes, laws, and procedures contained in this article may not be current and may have been revised since the time of publication or may contain errors. An attorney can provide legal guidance only after reviewing the details of your individual case.

Loss of Mobility is Scary

Loss of mobility can be scary. According to researchers at Harvard University Medical school, loss of mobility is not just an inconvenience – it is a major life-altering event. Anyone from the elderly to the physically active can be affected by loss of mobility. Sometimes it is the result of aging, but, just as often, it is because of an injury.

Loss of Mobility is Scary

Loss of mobility “has profound social, psychological, and physical consequences.”[1] These consequences can be emotionally and mentally damaging. Imagine not being able to get up and move in an emergency, or not being able to make a quick trip to the store, or not being able to visit friends or family. Think about how many times a day you get up out of your chair and go to the bathroom, head over to the fridge for a snack, or simply go grab something you need from the other room. Now imagine not being able to do any of those things or being at the mercy of someone else to help you do them.

The consequences of loss of mobility are far-reaching. “Social engagement, the real life activity that results from association with one’s social ties, is important in reinforcing existing social relationships and provides a sense of value and identity,” and the loss of these ties can be scary and isolating for someone who has been injured.[2]

The loss of mobility is such a life-changing and scary thing that there are hundreds of websites and user posts dedicated to dealing with the fear and isolation that comes with the loss of mobility. Researchers pour thousands of dollars and hours into finding ways to help reduce the fear that results from a loss of mobility after an injury.

One study of active individuals showed that, unlike those who could continue their activities, the individuals who were stopped from taking part in activities for as little as two weeks resulted in “significantly greater symptoms of psychological distress, including depression, anxiety, confusion, over-all mood disturbance, and lower self-esteem.”[3]

For a normally active individual, not being able to be active for a little as two weeks can result in depression, anxiety, and lowed self-esteem. Two weeks is enough for depression and anxiety, imagine the effect of a life-time of lost mobility.

According to the Shepheard Center, a non-profit hospital, people who suffer a loss of mobility are likely to go through the same stages of grief as those who have lost a loved one – denial, disbelief, sadness, and anger.[4] Long-lasting or permeant loss of mobility can cause someone the same type of emotional distress—the same sadness and fears—as someone who has lost a loved one.

If you have lost mobility because of an injury as the result of a someone else’s negligence, see a doctor, and, as always, please call Groth Law Firm, S.C. with any questions.  We are available 24/7 to discuss your options as the victim of negligence. Our initial consultations are always free.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not legal advice and should not be used as legal advice. It is not medical advice and should not be used as medical advice. The legal statutes, laws, and procedures contained in this article may not be current and may have been revised since the time of publication or contain errors. An attorney can provide legal guidance only after reviewing the details of your individual case.

[1] https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/two-questions-can-reveal-mobility-problems-in-seniors-201309186682

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3683993/

[3] http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.2466/pms.1988.66.3.875

[4] https://www.shepherd.org/patient-programs/spinal-cord-injury/after-rehab/adapting-to-loss-of-mobility

Wisconsin Solo and Small Firm Practice Committtee

If you like free marketing tips and links to great legal blogs I have the website for you.

The Solo and Small Firm Practice Committee of the State Bar of Wisconsin just launched their new site.

Note the three “tips” located in the middle of the page:  Marketing Tip, Blog Roll and  Practice Resources.

If you are in a small firm in Wisconsin you should certainly join this State Bar Committee.

Thanks for Attending the Wisconsin Solo and Small Firm Conference

On behalf of the other speakers, committee members and program chairs, Thanks!  This was a very successful conference.  We covered everything from intellectual property, practice management and marketing to personal injury and, of course, cutting edge technology and blogging.

I’d like to thank Rob Teuber and Chris Moander for helping put together a great presentation on Blogging, Podcasts and the Internet.  I hope that our audience got some useful information from yesterday’s presentation.

www.jonpgroth.com

Wisconsin Solo and Small Firm Conference

It’s time for the WSSFC in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin.   Check out the website for more information.

Some of the headliners are Kevin O’Keefe, Laurel Bellows, and Connie Kilmark.

It’s a three day conference and covers a ton of different topics.  Check it out.  If you are going then I’ll see you there (I’m speaking Friday afternoon).  If you forgot to register and want to come on by please do.  Otherwise, put it on your calendar for next year!

www.jonpgroth.com